BKS BOXER CLUB

BKS BOXER CLUB

Boxer History

Origins and development

History and Delopment of the Breed

In the  beginning  of the boxer - so the story - was a crossing of the genetically totally unknown dogs of the Bullfighter bred to the English Bulldog. The well known pioneer and sponsor of the breed  FRIEDERUN STOCKMANN
emphasizes, that many dogs in the first stud book were registered with unknown ancestors of whom you could not realize anymore how much Bulldog blood was in  their puppies.  In No. 1 of the stud book  211 dogs were registered. Out of these were 46 white oder checked ones,which sums up to 21 %. Out of these many different types the right type had to be found. There were fawn ones, brindle, checked or white, coarse or light ones, short legged and long types. Many had harelips. Not what the boxer was in those times, but what he should be in the future according to the standard of 1905, fanciers had to imagine. A handsome, elegant family dog, free of every repugnant or even frightening ugliness.

Let us compare the little Baer- or Bullfighter with the English Bulldog.The sturdy, strong boned Bullfighter with the nearly square confirmation showed especially in the head considerable differences from nowadays picture of the boxer standard, as the chin was nearly not market at all. The stop between skull and nose bridge was not clearly marked. Even from the side you noticed the broad and flat skull. This can also be seen at the copper engraving, showing that obviously already in those times big flews were connected to loose skin, the broad necklace was obviously not able to hide the loose skin. The mighty cow hocked hindquarters were disturbing according to our nowadays ideas about the standard performance . The broad muzzle  with the black mask and the already slightly tilted nose showed very precisely the use for hunting and wanted form of the head of the Baer- and Bullfighter 240 years ago.

We realize what was needed to differentiate the boxer type from the bulldog type, as there was the stop and the bent upwards under jaw, the chin. First of all these characteristics had to be fixed. Therefore inbreeding to a few initial dogs was necessary. Inbreeding is the mean to achieve balance within a very short time what can otherwise only be reached slowly in an outcross breeding. By use of this method the wanted results are hoped to be fixed homozygously  in the gene pool. But suddenly some peculiarities occurred which were unwanted. The most unwanted faults in breeding boxers are harelips, cleft palates and cryptorchism. They are carried on recessively in boxer breeding since the beginning.

Also the upright hindquarters, like the male Muehlbauers FLOCKI showed, prove to be as a very insistint heritage of the bulldog. FLOCKI has a very steady place in  history of boxer breeding. He is historically so important, because he was the very first boxer in the German stud book and 1895 was shown as first boxer in a trial class in Munich. Already quite attractive were his good head proportions, which gave him a pleasant expression. His mother was ALTS SCHECKIN. Compared to his father, the white bulldog TÖNNISSEN TOM, FLOCKI had a straight front with a good length of forelegs.

The bulldog TOM could not been left out of breeding, just like his granddaughter META VON DER PASSAGE. It is really difficult to imagine that this long bitch with her soft back and the loose forehand  produced quite a number of important dogs. She was white like her parents.  She became a milestone in boxer breeding the first mother of all our boxers nowadays.She became the milestone for the future of the Boxer breed, with which today she has only a very slight resemblance. META had produced  the plain GIGERL in 1901. GIGERL was a relatively small dog, but had already the striking head profile. He became a much asked  stud, because he repressed  a bit the white ones. As one of the first champions in the breed he was responsible for a spreading of his head type.

META’S son  HUGO VON PFALZGAU with a granddaughter of GIGERL via  CURT VON PFALZGAU produced  the elegant  ROLF VON VOGELSBERG. Not only as one of the first studs he had a size of 59 cm but showed as representative of the brindle boxers a good harmony between front and back. ROLF was  especially valuable for breeding, because he sired the basis for the worldwide known boxer breeding VOM DOM.

From FRIEDERUN STOCKMAN we learn that there always were two types of the boxer. The fawn boxers had an iron strong, mighty body, while the brindle ones had the typical heads and more nobility, but also the roached back with the poorly angulated hindquarters. ROLF VON VOGELSBERG and his son ROLF WALHALLwere an exception, especially ROLF WALHALL had a firm back and hindquarter.
These two studs were leading in  breeding during World War I until times became too hard for sport activities with dogs. During the last three war years only 230 boxers were registered.


ROLF WALHALL sired a remarkable brindle male over MORITZ VON GOLDRAIN.CAESAR VON DEUTENKOFEN was especially valuable for breeding. His positive impact on the development of the breed became extremely obvious, when one of the most successful studs of all times SIGURD VON DOM came to the scene in the beginning of 1930 and  the following years. SIGURD was the grandson of a half bother and half daughter mating going back to their father CAESAR.

In order to close the great gaps caused by World WAR I, in 1921 the “Boxer Stud book” was opened for one year for all boxers without pedigree, what  should not come up as an advantage for pedigree breeding. Since 1925 no black nor white boxers were allowed anymore to be registered.From 1929 on also the checked ones were forbidden for breeding. In 1924 the Club finally achieved a long wanted goal when the boxer was recognized as  police dog. Due to this his size was adjusted to 60 cm for a male. Some boxer fanciers, who were convinced that the popularity and widely spread popularity of the breed goes back to its excellent attitudes as a family dog, were rather skeptical when the boxer was recognized as  police dog.They were also concerned that the forceful increase in the size could be to the detriment of type. The size of the Boxer at that time reached at most 55 cm at the withers. The general opinion was that the smaller and medium dogs were the better type carriers.Iwein v. Dom brought good size, power and type to the breed.  He was bred in 1925 by Friederun Stockmann from Zwiebel v. Dom, a granddaughter of Rolf v. Vogelsberg bred to Buko v. Biederstein.  Buko was tightly bred on Rolf Walhall.  Buko’s sire was Cäsar v. Deutenkofen, who was out of the Rolf Walhall son, Moritz v. Goldrain.  Buko’s dam and Moritz were siblings.  Iwein was a tall dog with great depth of chest and a wonderful head, with an especially broad and powerful muzzle. Friederun Stockmann tells the story that his aggressive nature, despite his good points, robbed him of every success in the show ring.  He was the only non-champion, who produced two champions: Thea v. Isebeck and Sigurd v. Dom.Sigurd’s head was not quite as noble as that of his sire but he had a model body.  He was the grandson of a half brother/half sister mating out of Cäsar v. Deutenkofen.  Sigurd was able to transfer the prepotency of Cäsar exceptionally well to his progeny.  It is well known how Sigurd influenced the Boxer breed in Europe.  He influenced the breed in the USA on an even broader base when he was sold there at the age of 5 years. His remarkable influence is endorsed by the 321 champions in America,in the period 1940 to 1947.

In Germany Sigurd left behind two noteworthy males, the World champion Fachinger v. Neu-Drosedow, who in general appearance was very close to his sire, and Zorn v. Dom.

Zorn did not become a champion however, he was very prepotent, especially as regards his excellent head type. Zorn, not only through his sire Sigurd but also through his dam traced back to the immensely important Cäsar v. Deutenkofen,.

In 1933 Friederun Stockmann produced once more a great litter of which every breeder can only dream of.  Out of Zorn and Esta v. d. Würm, the half siblings out of Sigurd, a male was born who, in the history of the Boxer breed, is noted as the greatest Boxer of all time:  Lustig v. Dom.

Lustig was a magnificent Boxer with ideal type characteristics. He combined good substance with nobility added to which was a perfect model head with fine chiselled skull and enormous muzzle. The well arched neck permitted the head to be carried proudly. Today there is no Boxer that does not go back to Lustig. With the two legendary males Sigurd and Lustig, Friederun Stockmann had, without a doubt, the greatest part of the absolute high point in the breed in the 1930’s. If we compare the dogs of this period with the original dogs, this progress was the most important that the development of the breed had ever experienced. From the small, plump Boxer with dissimilar head, a tall, elegant dog evolved. It is due to Friederun Stockmann that the Boxer breed achieved its most important development ever.

Without the legendary males Sigurd, Lustig and Utz v. Dom and without Dorian v. Marienhof, the only brindle in this quartet, the Boxer breed would never have reached the phenomenal heights in many countries of the world. These males demonstrate the absolute ideal of carefully planned pioneer work over many years through impressive dogs like Rolf v. Vogelsberg. Along with some other good Boxers the “Great Four” were sold to America as a result of the difficult post war years in Germany.

German breed influences in America and England        

In 1904 the first boxer, Arnulf v. Graudenz, was registered in the studbook of the AKC (American Kennel Club). Arnulf was sired by a son of Wotan out of a daughter of Flock St. Salvatore.  In the beginning our breed made little impression as there were only a few pet Boxers in the country.

In 1914 notice was taken of the import Dampf v. Dom, a son of Rolf v. Vogelsberg.  Due to World War I Dampf, who became the first American Champion, could not do much for the breed.  The breakthrough only came about at the beginning of the thirties with Check v. Hunnenstein, whose brilliant show career in the States suddenly brought our dog into the limelight.  From then on the breed gained quickly in popularity - a stream of imports having arrived in the country.  Many excellent dogs like Bastel v. Elbufer, Pitt v. d. Wuerm and Karlo v. d. Wolfsschlucht were bought in Germany.  During this period of tremendous successful activity, American breeders achieved the biggest coup with the importation of Sigurd v. Dom, Dorian v. Marienhof, Lustig v. Dom and Utz v. Dom.

This male line descended from Gigerl and Kurt v. Pfalzgau, through Rolf v. VogelsbergRolf Wallhall and Moritz v. Goldrain, and, initially, to Caesar v. Deutenkofen. He sired two excellent sons, Bucko v. Biederstein, who was the sire of Sigurd’s sire Iwein v. Dom and Check v. Hunnenstein, who in turn left two daughters who were great producers: Saxonias Andl, dam of Dorian, and Dudel v. Pfarrhaus, who was mated to Sigurd and produced Zorn v. Dom and Xerxes v. DomZorn was the sire of Lustig and Utz while Xerxes produced Dorian.

When Sigurd, at the age of 5 years, came to the States in 1934 he already had the reputation of being one of the greatest show dogs and sires in Europe. In the States he was mated to a few bitches of mediocre quality. Remarkably, he sired 25 champions but even more so was the fact that of 321 champions during the period 1940 to 1947 a total of 313 went back to Sigurd. His immense worth to the development of the breed is characterized by the words of an American Boxer friend: “More than anyone else, we are indebted to Sigurd for consistent perfect balance between power and elegance.”

The most influential grandson of Sigurd was Lustig.  He was unbeaten in the ring both in Europe and in the States, a proud Boxer with superb, noble attitude and near perfect proportions between muzzle and skull and expression. His record as a sire was unique to our breed, and he made an indelible stamp on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean having sired 41 American champions.  When he left Germany in 1937 he had passed on a sufficiently broad genetic base, which also improved the breed fantastically all over Europe.                       

Dorian, the only brindle in this quartet, left Germany 1936 at the age of two years. Unbeaten in the ring like Lustig, he not only impressed with his elegance and substance but also with his phenomenal movement, which made him famous. Though Dorian was not used at stud as often as Lustig, he sired 37 American champions and many important sires descend from him.

Utz, the brother of Lustig out of a later litter, arrived in America in 1939 shortly before the outbreak of World War II. Maybe he was not as well known as SigurdLustig and Dorian, but nevertheless he played an equally important role in the development of the Boxer breed in America.  In one year he sired 9 champions out of 6 different bitches - a remarkable achievement.  As a leading stud dog he sired 35 American champions in 5 years.

Skilful line breeding with progeny out of DorianLustig and Utz gave the American Boxer breed world wide recognition through probably the most successful representatives like Warlord of Maizelaine, Merry Monarch, Mazelaine‘s ZazaracBrandy and Bang Away Of Sirrah Crest. Bang Away, the “superstar” in America’s show ring having reached an all time record of 100 Best in Show wins in 1955, which has never been achieved again.

In 1933 Friederun Stockmann produced once more a great litter of which every breeder can only dream of.  Out of Zorn and Esta v. d. Würm, the half siblings out of Sigurd, a male was born who, in the history of the Boxer breed, is noted as the greatest Boxer of all time:  Lustig v. Dom.

Lustig was a magnificent Boxer with ideal type characteristics. He combined good substance with nobility added to which was a perfect model head with fine chiselled skull and enormous muzzle. The well arched neck permitted the head to be carried proudly. Today there is no Boxer that does not go back to Lustig.

With the two legendary males Sigurd and Lustig, Friederun Stockmann had, without a doubt, the greatest part of the absolute high point in the breed in the 1930’s. If we compare the dogs of this period with the original dogs, this progress was the most important that the development of the breed had ever experienced. From the small, plump Boxer with dissimilar head, a tall, elegant dog evolved. It is due to Friederun Stockmann that the Boxer breed achieved its most important development ever.

Without the legendary males Sigurd, Lustig and Utz v. Dom and without Dorian v. Marienhof, the only brindle in this quartet, the Boxer breed would never have reached the phenomenal heights in many countries of the world. These males demonstrate the absolute ideal of carefully planned pioneer work over many years through impressive dogs like Rolf v. Vogelsberg. Along with some other good Boxers the “Great Four” were sold to America as a result of the difficult post war years in Germany.

German breed influences in America        

In 1904 the first boxer, Arnulf v. Graudenz, was registered in the studbook of the AKC (American Kennel Club). Arnulf was sired by a son of Wotan out of a daughter of Flock St. Salvatore.  In the beginning our breed made little impression as there were only a few pet Boxers in the country.

In 1914 notice was taken of the import Dampf v. Dom, a son of Rolf v. Vogelsberg.  Due to World War I Dampf, who became the first American Champion, could not do much for the breed.  The breakthrough only came about at the beginning of the thirties with Check v. Hunnenstein, whose brilliant show career in the States suddenly brought our dog into the limelight.  From then on the breed gained quickly in popularity - a stream of imports having arrived in the country.  Many excellent dogs like Bastel v. Elbufer, Pitt v. d. Wuerm and Karlo v. d. Wolfsschlucht were bought in Germany.  During this period of tremendous successful activity, American breeders achieved the biggest coup with the importation of Sigurd v. Dom, Dorian v. Marienhof, Lustig v. Dom and Utz v. Dom.

This male line descended from Gigerl and Kurt v. Pfalzgau, through Rolf v. VogelsbergRolf Wallhall and Moritz v. Goldrain, and, initially, to Caesar v. Deutenkofen. He sired two excellent sons, Bucko v. Biederstein, who was the sire of Sigurd’s sire Iwein v. Dom and Check v. Hunnenstein, who in turn left two daughters who were great producers: Saxonias Andl, dam of Dorian, and Dudel v. Pfarrhaus, who was mated to Sigurd and produced Zorn v. Dom and Xerxes v. DomZorn was the sire of Lustig and Utz while Xerxes produced Dorian.

When Sigurd, at the age of 5 years, came to the States in 1934 he already had the reputation of being one of the greatest show dogs and sires in Europe. In the States he was mated to a few bitches of mediocre quality. Remarkably, he sired 25 champions but even more so was the fact that of 321 champions during the period 1940 to 1947 a total of 313 went back to Sigurd. His immense worth to the development of the breed is characterized by the words of an American Boxer friend: “More than anyone else, we are indebted to Sigurd for consistent perfect balance between power and elegance.”

The most influential grandson of Sigurd was Lustig.  He was unbeaten in the ring both in Europe and in the States, a proud Boxer with superb, noble attitude and near perfect proportions between muzzle and skull and expression.

His record as a sire was unique to our breed, and he made an indelible stamp on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean having sired 41 American champions.  When he left Germany in 1937 he had passed on a sufficiently broad genetic base, which also improved the breed fantastically all over Europe.                       

Dorian, the only brindle in this quartet, left Germany 1936 at the age of two years. Unbeaten in the ring like Lustig, he not only impressed with his elegance and substance but also with his phenomenal movement, which made him famous. Though Dorian was not used at stud as often as Lustig, he sired 37 American champions and many important sires descend from him.

Utz, the brother of Lustig out of a later litter, arrived in America in 1939 shortly before the outbreak of World War II. Maybe he was not as well known as SigurdLustig and Dorian, but nevertheless he played an equally important role in the development of the Boxer breed in America.  In one year he sired 9 champions out of 6 different bitches - a remarkable achievement.  As a leading stud dog he sired 35 American champions in 5 years.

Skilful line breeding with progeny out of DorianLustig and Utz gave the American Boxer breed world wide recognition through probably the most successful representatives like Warlord of Maizelaine, Merry Monarch, Mazelaine‘s ZazaracBrandy and Bang Away Of Sirrah Crest. Bang Away, the “superstar” in America’s show ring having reached an all time record of 100 Best in Show wins in 1955, which has never been achieved again.

Sigurd v. Dom 1929 Considered as the greatest genetic influence on the breed

A male that had produced good size, substance and type was Iwein von Dom, the sire of Sigurd.                             

The dominance of Sigurd is explained by his strong inbreeding through Iwein’s dam and the dominant Caesar v. Deutenkofen. Sigurd’s grand sires on both sides were sons of Caesar – he was thus a grandson out of combination of two half brothers. We take cognizance of other, more recent examples that this method of breeding has proven to be successful when a male of great breeding potential is available. Sigurd von Dom passed on the potent genes of Caesar in an outstanding manner to his progeny. Sigurd´s head was not quite as noble as that of his sire but he had a model body. It is well known how Sigurd influenced the Boxer breed in Europe. He influenced the breed in the USA on an even broader base when he was sold there at the age of 5 years. His remarkable influence is endorsed by the 321 champions in America, in the period 1940 to 1947, which traced back to him. America owes all that is best in her Boxers through “The Great Four” and to Sigurd most of all, because he was the grand sire of the other three! Thus the blood lines in the best American pedigrees are the same as those in the foremost European ones. In Germany Sigurd left behind two noteworthy males, the World champion Fachinger v. Neu-Drosedow, who in general appearance was very close to his sire, and Zorn v. Dom. Zorn was not the capital male like his sire but for stud purposes he was important as both on sire’s and dam’s side he went back to Caesar v. Deutenkofen.

From the mating of the half brother Zorn to his half sister Esta v.d. Wuerm in 1933 Friederun Stockmann achieved the great litter with the phenomenal Lustig von Dom, who was esteemed in the history of the breed as the greatest Boxer of all times. Today there is no Boxer that does not go back to Lustig. He was a magnificent Boxer with ideal type characteristics. Of good substance he showed elegance and nobility, harmony between length of neck and length of back that was influenced by the good placement of the shoulders. The well arched neck permitted the head to be carried proudly. In addition, he had an absolute model of a head with a lean skull and massive muzzle. Lustig was able to produce 41 champions. Lustig also remained unbeaten in America, a proud dog of noble bearing up to the ripe old age of 12 years. Utz v. Dom, the brother of Lustig from a later litter played an equally important role in America as Lustig did. As a result of these two males the Boxer breed on both sides of the Atlantic reached a significant high standing.

With the two legendary males Sigurd and Lustig, Friederun Stockmann had, without a doubt, the greatest part of the absolute high point in the breed in the 1930’s. If we compare the dogs of this period with the original dogs, this progress was the most important that the development of the breed had ever experienced. From the small, plump Boxer with dissimilar head, a tall, elegant dog evolved. It is due to Friederun Stockmann that the Boxer breed achieved its most important development ever. Without the legendary males Sigurd, Lustig and Utz v. Dom and without Dorian v. Marienhof, the only brindle in this quartet, the Boxer breed would never have reached the phenomenal heights in many countries of the world. These males demonstrate the absolute ideal of carefully planned pioneer work over many years through impressive dogs like Rolf v. Vogelsberg.

Dorian von Marienhof

Dorian played an important part in the expansion of the breed in America. At the age of two years he had already departed from Germany. Dorian originated from the kennel of Thekla Schneider in Dresden. His dam, Saxonias Andl, a bitch with exceptional prepotency, was a daughter of Check v. Hunnenstein, a son of the dominant Caesar v. Deutenkofen. Dorian’s sire, Xerxes v. Dom, was a son of Sigurd. On his dam’s side Xerxes went back on Caesar.                                                     

Dorian like Lustig was unbeaten in the ring, a medium size male, very noble in general appearance. His firm body of perfect outline and his remarkable gait made history in the USA.

Like many of his classic forebears the beautiful Lustig grandson Karlo v.d.Wolfsschlucht was also sold to America. After 1945 breeding of Boxers in Germany had come to a standstill, only revived very slowly.  In the difficult post war years where the population suffered of starvation it became noticeable that the best Boxers had been sold abroad. The breed had reached a very low point. One had to search for good Boxers and opportunities to orientate.

However, a few dogs were left: Buten v. Elbufer, Ajax v. d. Holderburg, Heiner v. Zwergeck, grandson Rex v. Hohenneuffen and great grandsons Dixi v.d. Karlsschlucht and Edler v.d. Fuhlenburg.

Dixi v.d. Karlsschlucht was Boxer of the Year in 1950 in East Germany.  His line, which on both his sire and dam’s side went back to Buten v. Elbufer, the son of Lustig v. Dom, was continued through his son Pirol v. Rosenheim.

Edler v.d.Fuhlenburg stood out for spreading of his powerful head type.  During the sixties breed warden Otto Donner with great  enthusiam started  promoting Edler sons Asbach and Ahmed v. d.Malergilde and outstanding Austrian bred studs so that  better boxer type was produced; his double Asbach v.d.Malergilde son Jonny v.d.Donnersburg 1964 and  second home-bred Vasko v.d.Donnersburg 1973 attracted attention and were used quite well. Vasko stemmed from Vittorio v. Winterhaus, the son of top Austrian producer Visconte v.d.Hubersiedlung out of well-known top Italian combination Zar di Cittanova x Flitter Val di Senio. Vittorio was recommended and frequently used in Germany by Peter Holzhausen and important  kennels v. Hasseler Hof & v. Fels. Boxers des Cassiflores & de la Vedette from France  followed.

Well-known German breeders, Dagmar Cyron and Manfred Gottwald also endorsed necessity of improving German standard requirements at that time. They used Austrian Oreste v. Winterhaus 1972 bred by Visconte v.d.Hubersiedlung  in their kennels v.d.Elchtränke and v.Schloss Münchhausen. Django v. Schloss Münchenhausen 1977 by Oreste ex Begum v. Schloss Münchhausen, Janus v. d. Elchtränke 1977 , by Django v. Schloss Münchhausen ex Austrian Import Della v. d. Sendnermühle , and Orwell v.d.Elchtränke 1986 by Django v.Schloss Münchhausen ex Della v.d.Sendnermühle´s daughter Karlotta v.d.Elchtränke, were successful in collecting esteemed international titles...

Four years after the end of World War II, Friederun Stockmann was the first German conformation judge to be invited to the USA and England to judge. She awarded Bang Away of Sirrah Crest at his first showing at the age of three months BEST IN MATCH 1949 at a big Southern California Boxer Match. Friederun Stockmann played a great part, in that not only building a bridge for better appreciation among nations but also that the love for our Boxer breed was kept alive. Mazelaine´sCzardas & Abra Dabra of Sirrah Crest( Dorian v. Marienhof and Utz v. Dom in 3rd and 4th generation in their pedidgrees) were kindly presented to Friederun Stockmann to rebuild Von Dom Kennels that was completely ruined through World War 2.  While "Szardas" was the only American bred Boxer ever to win l95O German Championship, "Abra Dabra" was of  special benefit for the German breeding. The most famous sons from this descent were Primus, Rival and Godewind v. Dom. Godewind´s grandfather was the capital male Bel Ami v. Viking Blut, whose powerful hindquarters successfully had been fixed through half sisters on " Abra Dabra". Godewind produced the most beautiful "Dirk v. Hohholz" - a stylish male who transmitted his class to Erasmus v. Nassau-Oranien 1965. "Erasmus" and his litter sister "Electra" assisted Willibald Wendel´s impressive start to his famous breeding v. Nassau-Oranien.

Friederun Stockmann for the last time appeared at the ATIBOX show in Giessen in 1963 and received a lovely farewell when Godewind von Dom was awarded the first male title in history of ATIBOX. Godewind´s most well-known sons which impressed through their style and outline were Eclipse Val Di Senio bred by Dr. Tomaso Bosi and Dirk v. Höhholz. Dirk reminded of Check v. Hunnenstein, who at the beginning of the thirties due to his excellent construction brought our Boxer into the spotlight in the USA. In Erasmus and his excellent sister Elektra the lines of Godewind von Dom and Witherford Hot Chestnut were deftly combined. This fusion recalls the famous union of the lines behind Lustig v. Dom with the progeny of Dorian v. Marienhof which in America and England, was not for nothing referred to as “the classic combination of our breed”.

In Erasmus and his excellent sister Elektra the lines of Godewind von Dom and Witherford Hot Chestnut were deftly combined. This fusion recalls the famous union of the lines behind Lustig v. Dom with the progeny of Dorian v. Marienhof which in America and England, was not for nothing referred to as “the classic combination of our breed.

​​The Boxer kennel “WITHERFORD” was founded in 1950 with a granddaughter of  Holger v. Germania,who was son of Ajax v. d. Holderburg ex Favoriet v. Haus Germania. She had her first litter with the British producer Winkinglight Jandan Jupiter, who was bred back to Lustig via Holger von Germania and Faust von Haus Germania. A bitch out of this combination was again mated back to her sire, thus fixing the German bloodlines in two champions, the bitch Witherford Sweet Talk and the male Witherford Crystal Clear.

Pat Withers had imported Xanti v.Dom. He was out of a half-brother/sister mating on Frau Stockmann´s US import Abra Dabra of Sirrah Crest. His sire was Bel Ami v. Wikingblut. Partly with American and partly with German bloodlines, in England Xanti was bred to a grand-daughter of US import Mazelaine’s Texas Ranger, the son of Verily-Verily of Sirrah Crest, the sister of Abra Dabra of Sirrah Crest. In this way the lines of Xanti v. Dom and Mazelaine’s Texas Ranger, who was a full brother of Bang Away of Sirrah Crest, were combined with the engrained Lustig v Dom lines of Witherford Crystal Clear. As a result, a sufficient amount of new blood through the Sirrah Crest line was introduced to the Lustig stock strongly represented through grand and great grandchildren in Witherford Hot Chestnut.

Through clever inbreeding on the lines of his close ancestors with German, Dutch and American background originating from Boxers von Dom continental breeders were very lucky that Hot Chestnut proved to be a dominant sire.

From an ancestry program used by the BK all the ancestors up to the 9 th and 10 th generation of Hot Chestnut are available. The following three Boxers are at the top of this table: 141 x Lustig v. Dom and his parents 186 x Zorn v. Dom – 142 x Esta v. der Würm (half brother/half sister of 49 x Sigurd v. Dom).  When he was retired, he had sired 42 champions in and outside of Germany and more than 50 progeny with certificates towards championship titles. .

During the sixties two of his sons turned out to be of extreme value to the development of the breed in Europe, Eros v. Heideloh and Carlo ut Gütsel. They combined the typical German substance from their dam’s side through Pirol v. Rosenheim with the overall Witherford elegance. These dogs brought back nobility in well chiseled heads with typical expression, attributes that were desperately needed at that time.        

Carlo ut Guetsel left two German-bred high quality sons. One of them was Gayus v. Schatzkaestlein. This classy Boxer stood out in the show ring for his balance in overall appearance and great showmanship. On his dam’s side he traced back to Friederun Stockmann´s Godewind v. Dom. The second important son by Carlo ut Guetsel was Iko v.Springbach, a prominent stud dog of breeder-judge Bodo Grolla - a result of half-brother/half-sister breeding on Witherford Hot Chestnut (Carlo ut Guetsel and Lira v Schuetting).                       

The most important step for the improvement and strengthening of today’s breeding stock in Europe was taken when Iko v Springbach was used on a daughter of Erasmus v Nassau-Oranien. The outcome of this mating was the great producer Carlo v Henningshof. When this outstanding young dog with his classic head type and exceptional Boxer expression won the World Youth Championship title he was sold to Italy from where he was expertly handled to great success by Joseph Waldhammer. Carlo v. Henningshof won many titles but his immense contribution to the breed was simply his exceptional prepotency, which cannot be valued highly enough. Carlo not only made a large contribution to the flourishing Boxer generations in Italy, his immense impact can be seen in his progeny wide-spread all over Europe.        

Among many excellent offspring of Carlo v. Henningshof a capital Boxer stood out by his marvelous expressive head and perfect front: Carlino v. Nassau-Oranien – the compact dominance of his ancestors was achieved for the breed of the 70ties by the extraordinary teamwork of two great friends that was so very fruitful for the highlights of this decade: Willibald Wendel and Horst Rethage with their kennels von Nassau-Oranien and v. Heideloh.

Out of the widely spread successful offspring of Carlo v. Henningshof and Carlino v. Nassau Oranien a great deal of the European progeny passed on the inherited excellent type of their ancestors. Special tribute goes to Hoss v.d. Goldquelle, from a half sibling´s mating to Carlino and to the Carlino grandson Xantos v. Bereler Ries, as well to Mirko v. Turmblick, grandson of Xantos. They immensely stabilized the dominance of continental breeding, assisted by the Italian producers Tito and Olympio Del Colle Del´Infinto as well as by French Athos de l ´Enfert Vert, German Ibsen v. Sembacher and French Perico Du Val D´Europe. Their unique impact caused furor all over Europe up to the end of 1990. The largest contribution to the modern European Boxer was made by Teck and David Del Colle Dell'Infinito.

In Germany over the years a wide range of selective tests for disposition and soundness of the breed were introduced. This regulation madness unfortunately led to a very small gene pool with the resultant loss of breed characteristics. So the standard of the breed in Germany unfortunately lost many high qualities achieved till end of last century. There were only a few breeders as the kennels v. German Dream, v. Santana and v. d. Busch who understood that during many years the breed pool had been totally emptied by too many restrictions and they started to find foreign males meeting the requirements for breeding in Germany. Luckily some  more breeders understood that a restricted breeding pool needs to be widened by imports of fresh ogenetics, I hope for the benefit of the breed in Germany the isolation will be realized and the system will be revised.

At the beginning of the 2000ties Atlanta v. German Dream claimed top position of the breed´s valuable dams in Germany. Her sire Ibsen leads to French Athos De L´Enfert, on her mother’s side she goes back to Xantos v. Bereler Ries and Texas v. Hause Rehberg. Atlana´s sons Future and In-Petto v. German Dream earned their top standing by their excellent background from Italy: Caos Dei Cavalieri Del Montferrato and Dylan Dei Centurioni (originating from Manfred Dei Centuioni - Szabo v.d.Houtrib - Jerome and Plato v.d.Hazenberg.)

This impressive period was concluded by powerful Orgon v. Fausto, he stemmed from In Petto and a Future daughter, and by the Orgon-son Uno v. Okeler Forst. Both males excellently transmitted strongly  fixed important boxer characteristics.